Farnaz on Featured, Media Coverage, Negating Stereotypes, Redefining Archetypes, New World Trends, New Realities, Women, Emerging Power

Cultural Change Expert explains why women don’t need to man up to be successful leaders

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE (by Tate Publishing)

ATLANTA, GA. – It’s The New World Marketplace afterall, and women, youth and multiculturalism are shaping our future.  A rapid cultural shift has occurred over the last decade, but author and thought leader Farnaz Wallace believes it’s not being addressed by businesses and leaders.

“With all the great empowerment initiatives for women today, we are still looking at massive gender inequality in corridors of power,” she said.  “Many great women thought leaders point to re-evaluating business policies to eliminate obstacles that force talented women to choose between family and career, and others point to women’s ambition calling us all to man up–but I believe there are 4 missing links from this important dialogue.”

Wallace breaks these down into four essentials for women to succeed in The New World Marketplace Leadership: Inner-authenticity, Being the woman leader other women want to work for, Re-defining Power, and Avoiding all gender stereotypes.

“I’ve always believed once you gain trust and respect, love always follows,” she said.  “But how can women gain trust and respect if they’re trying to be someone they are not?”  Wallace believes it’s far more important to find the richest, fullest expression of one’s authentic self, and spend majority of time in strength and passion and generate results, versus trying to fit into a perceived cultural norm.

“Research shows that women have a tougher time working for women,” she said.  “To be a successful leader, people of all ages, cultures, race and gender must want to follow and work for you, specially other women.  Men and women largely agree on life goals. It is the position of power and domination that differentiates us, not just between men and women, but also among women ourselves.”

“That’s even more of an important toptic than gender inequality because the old business culture of command and control doesn’t work for men or women,” she said.  Wallace believes it is time to redefine power as less need to limit or control others, and define power as affiliation, linking and partnership–a blend of hard and soft powers, she calls it “smart” powers.  “Women don’t need to man up to be successful, they need to possess smart powers,” she said.

“Women are different than other women, just as men are different than other men, why the continuous focus on gender stereotyping?” she asks.  “I believe if we want to achieve gender equality, we must first stop gender stereotyping for it serves no purpose other than protecting traditional orthodoxies that have held women back for generations.”

Wallace is a thought leader, speaker, and strategic consultant focused on helping companies capitalize on cultural macro trends in today’s fast-changing marketplace. She is the published author of the book, The New World Marketplace, and presently resides in Atlanta.

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Beliefs, Causes and Values

I use a unique emotional and cultural framework in my consulting and speaking business that revolve around beliefs and values.  I thought it’d be a good idea to share a short blog on this topic with my loyal readers.

Beliefs are the assumptions we make about ourselves and others.  Convictions and concepts we hold to be true, with or without evidence.  How we expect things to be, what we think is true and real.  Our beliefs grow from what we see, hear, experience and think about.  And beliefs manifest in what we say and do.  They are the basis for decision-making and drive consumption behavior for businesses, as well as how we communicate and relate with others.

Our values stem from our beliefs.  Values are about how we think things or people ought to be in terms of qualities and guiding principles that are important to us – such as honesty, integrity, loyalty, trust, openness, freedom, peace, happiness, empathy, compassion, equality, faithfulness, etc.   While some values are universal in unanimous global agreement – such as honesty, integrity, peace – many values vary based on culture, religion, and beliefs that are widely shared and rarely questioned.

I’ve seen many companies post their values on their web site.  Some even mark leadership, innovation and customer focus as values.  And why not.  They are beliefs that are widely shared and rarely questioned.  But I’d ask….are your values aligned with those of your customers and relationships that are important to you?

If you have any intentions to grab a piece of the $2 trillion marketplace that is multicultural and youthful where women have become key players, you may want to consider these values as thought starters in your cultural and emotional frameworks for marketing messages :

  • Multicultural:  Trust, Acceptance, Respect, Understanding
  • Women:  Trust, Equality, Thoughtfulness, Service
  • Youth:  Inspiration, Creativity, Freedom, Adventure

Yes, there are more…and with commonalities.  Find them, communicate them, but most importantly, be honest and authentic about them.  Your fans will know the difference.

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Atlanta Woman: July/August 2008: Being Authentic

Farnaz Wallace was interviewed by Lucy Soto of Atlanta Woman for her article, Being Authentic, on her successful and inspirational career and life.  Farnaz’s method of and outlook on marketing Church’s Chicken is truly influential and have led to Church’s outstanding results.  Farnaz explains, “At the end of the day, one of the things I’ve really discovered is in order to be successful you have to be authentic.  And that state of authenticity allows you to be creative and productive.  Diversity translates into numbers.  Inclusion and diversity translates into bottom line profits for companies.  Once you prove that and you gain the respect, love will follow.”  Download the PDF.

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